From the CCS® Sales Blog

September 2016

Viewing posts from September , 2016

Sales Tips: 5-Step Execution Plan for Q4

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/sales-tips-5-step-execution-plan-for-q4″ title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://blog.customercentric.com/hubfs/Year-end_Ahead.png?t=1489093932032″ alt=”Sales Tips for Q4″ class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<p><span style=”font-size: 24px; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;”><strong><span style=”color: #152d53;”>Sales Tips:&nbsp;5-Step Execution Plan for Q4</span></strong></span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><em>By Gary Walker, EVP of Channel Sales &amp; Operations, <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com”>CustomerCentric Selling®</a>&nbsp;- The Sales Training Company</em></span></p>
<img src=”http://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=22968&amp;k=14&amp;r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.customercentric.com%2Fblog%2Fsales-tips-5-step-execution-plan-for-q4&amp;bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.customercentric.com%252Fblog&amp;bvt=rss” alt=”” width=”1″ height=”1″ style=”min-height:1px!important;width:1px!important;border-width:0!important;margin-top:0!important;margin-bottom:0!important;margin-right:0!important;margin-left:0!important;padding-top:0!important;padding-bottom:0!important;padding-right:0!important;padding-left:0!important; “>

Sales Tips: Race to December 31st – Marathon vs. Sprints

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/sales-tips-marathon-or-sprint-to-year-end” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://blog.customercentric.com/hubfs/runner.png?t=1489093932032″ alt=”sales tips for making year-end number” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<h1>Sales Tips: Marathon vs. Sprints</h1>
<em><span class=”post-meta-infos” style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><span class=”blog-author minor-meta”>By John Holland<span class=”entry-author-link”><span class=”vcard author”><span class=”fn”>, Chief Content Officer,&nbsp;<a href=”http://www.customercentric.com”>CustomerCentric Selling®</a> – The Sales Training Company</span></span></span></span></span></em>
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<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><strong>Sales can be viewed as a series of races that end December 31<sup>st</sup> and start the very next day.</strong> This is the time of the year that many salespeople assess whether they can make their number this year or should slow some opportunities down to get off to a fast start in 2017.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>As a sales manager, most of my sellers hit the accelerator hard as needed. In other words, they treated a year as a series of sprints that were needed when pipelines were thin. I was usually fortunate to have some steady performers that viewed the year like a marathon and set the pace that yielded more consistent results and <em>far</em> less drama.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>As there are 26 milestones in a marathon, these sellers broke the year into 12 parts. I wish I had the wisdom back then to encourage all of my staff to look a sales cycle ahead to evaluate whether their pipelines were sufficient to deliver the numbers needed for them to be YTD against quota or better. <strong>A steady approach is less stressful and reduces the peaks and valleys that otherwise occur.</strong>&nbsp;</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Let’s say you “sprint” the last few months of 2016. The best scenario is that you make your number this year but find 2017 is effectively a 10-month year because you had to close most everything that was in your pipeline. Sprinting and coming up short is the worst-case scenario.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>I encourage sellers to make a New Years resolution <em>now</em>&nbsp;to <strong><em>build pipeline every month</em></strong>. Rather than rely upon inbound leads that are non-Key Players, do some proactive business development to targeted accounts and titles. I’d venture to say if sellers tried to contact two prospects a day, they would be on their way to more steady performance. Make 2017 a better year by making these changes NOW.</span></p>
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<img src=”http://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=22968&amp;k=14&amp;r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.customercentric.com%2Fblog%2Fsales-tips-marathon-or-sprint-to-year-end&amp;bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.customercentric.com%252Fblog&amp;bvt=rss” alt=”” width=”1″ height=”1″ style=”min-height:1px!important;width:1px!important;border-width:0!important;margin-top:0!important;margin-bottom:0!important;margin-right:0!important;margin-left:0!important;padding-top:0!important;padding-bottom:0!important;padding-right:0!important;padding-left:0!important; “>

Sales Tips: Marathon vs. Sprints

sales tips for making year-end numberSales can be viewed as a series of races that end December 31st and start the very next day. This is the time of the year that many salespeople assess whether they can make their number this year or should slow some opportunities down to get off to a fast start in 2017.

As a sales manager, most of my sellers hit the accelerator hard as needed. In other words, they treated a year as a series of sprints that were needed when pipelines were thin. I was usually fortunate to have some steady performers that viewed the year like a marathon and set the pace that yielded more consistent results and far less drama.

As there are 26 milestones in a marathon, these sellers broke the year into 12 parts. I wish I had the wisdom back then to encourage all of my staff to look a sales cycle ahead to evaluate whether their pipelines were sufficient to deliver the numbers needed for them to be YTD against quota or better. A steady approach is less stressful and reduces the peaks and valleys that otherwise occur. 

Let’s say you “sprint” the last few months of 2016. The best scenario is that you make your number this year but find 2017 is effectively a 10-month year because you had to close most everything that was in your pipeline. Sprinting and coming up short is the worst-case scenario.

I encourage sellers to make a New Years resolution now to build pipeline every month. Rather than rely upon inbound leads that are non-Key Players, do some proactive business development to targeted accounts and titles. I’d venture to say if sellers tried to contact two prospects a day, they would be on their way to more steady performance. Make 2017 a better year by making these changes NOW.

CCS Evangelists

Sales Tips: WHY Good Sales Teams Lose

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/sales-tips-why-good-sales-teams-lose” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://blog.customercentric.com/hubfs/sales-team-meeting-1.png?t=1489093932032″ alt=”sales-team-meeting-1.png” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<h1>Sales Tips: Understanding Why Good Sales Teams Lose in Competitive B2B Opportunities</h1>
<em><span class=”post-meta-infos” style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><span class=”blog-author minor-meta”>by <span class=”entry-author-link”><span class=”vcard author”><span class=”fn”>Carolyn Galvin, <a href=”https://www.primary-intel.com”>Primary Intelligence</a></span></span></span></span></span></em>
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<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Sales losses are hard. And they’re especially hard when&nbsp;the engagement has been long, difficult, and complex.&nbsp;Sales teams often feel as though they’ve given their best&nbsp;proposal, their best price, their best value proposition.&nbsp;But sometimes, that just isn’t enough to seal the deal.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>After a loss, it’s tempting to walk away and not look&nbsp;back. After all, looking back can be painful. Better to&nbsp;start over with a fresh opportunity, right? Not necessarily.</span></p>
<h3><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Using Win Loss Analysis to Learn From the Past and Win in the Future</span></h3>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>It’s true that understanding losses can dredge up painful&nbsp;memories. But looking back and analyzing what went&nbsp;well, and not so well, can also provide insights for the&nbsp;next competitive opportunity. Not understanding what&nbsp;caused you to lose will cause you to repeat past mistakes.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>In <a href=”https://www.primary-intel.com/resources/win-loss-analysis-strategize-your-results/” style=”color: #152d53;”>Win Loss Analysis</a>, loss drivers—reasons for losing&nbsp;those hard-fought competitive deals—can be broken&nbsp;down into several different categories:</span></p>
<h4><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>1. Sales Effectiveness:</span></h4>
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<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How effective was the sales approach in convincing the&nbsp;buyer that their offering was better than that of the&nbsp;competitor’s?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How well did the sales team know the product or&nbsp;service they were selling? Could reps answer questions&nbsp;about the product’s functionality? If not, did they enlist&nbsp;the help of a technical expert to fully address the&nbsp;buyer’s concerns?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Was the sales team responsive when the buyer&nbsp;reached out for information or follow-up detail? How&nbsp;quickly did sales get back to the buyer?Was the&nbsp;response in the medium in which the buyer prefers to&nbsp;communicate (email, text, live call, etc.)?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How well did the sales team understand the buyer’s&nbsp;needs? Did they take the time to do <br>discovery with the&nbsp;buyer to really understand their pain points? Or did&nbsp;sales lead with a discussion about their own solution’s&nbsp;capabilities without fully understanding what was&nbsp;relevant to the buyer?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How well did sales demonstrate the product and&nbsp;company’s capabilities? Was the presentation&nbsp;personalized to the buyer’s company, such as using&nbsp;their company logo? Or was the presentation&nbsp;generic, unpolished, or too high level? Was an online&nbsp;presentation offered when the buyer really wanted&nbsp;an on-site visit?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Did the sales team facilitate the purchase transaction&nbsp;for the buyer, including transitions between groups&nbsp;within the vendor organization, contract discussions,&nbsp;and legal hurdles?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How well did sales understand the buyer’s industry?&nbsp;Did they research macro environmental forces shaping&nbsp;the buyer’s environment? Did they dive deep into the&nbsp;buyer’s firm, as well as competitive pressures, to better&nbsp;understand the operating environment?</span></li>
</ul>
<h4><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>2. Solution Capabilities:</span></h4>
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<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How effective was the solution that was proposed in&nbsp;meeting the buyer’s needs? Did it address key pain&nbsp;points highlighted by the buyer?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Was the solution intuitive? Did it have a good look and&nbsp;feel? An easy-to-use interface? What was the buyer’s&nbsp;first and last impression?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Was an explanation given for different configurations,&nbsp;options, and customizations that are available for the&nbsp;product? Can customers scale up or down as business&nbsp;needs change? How easy or difficult is this to actually&nbsp;accomplish?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How well did the solution compare to competitors’&nbsp;offerings? Were key differentiators of the solution&nbsp;described by segment, vertical, and/or geography?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Is there a partner ecosystem for customers who may&nbsp;fall outside of traditional solution fulfillment? How was&nbsp;this positioned to the buyer, including responsibility for&nbsp;service and support issues that may arise?</span></li>
</ul>
<h4><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>3. Company Impact:</span></h4>
<ul>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How solid is the company’s reputation? Is the firm&nbsp;recognized as a leader in the market? A laggard?&nbsp;Why does that perception exist and how can a good&nbsp;reputation be leveraged and a poor reputation be&nbsp;improved?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How effective is the organization’s service and support&nbsp;capabilities? How long are hold times when customers&nbsp;want to talk or text with the support team? What’s&nbsp;the abandonment rate for service requests? Are SLAs&nbsp;consistently being met?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Were customers provided with solid customer reference&nbsp;accounts that underscore the benefits of the solutions&nbsp;being offered? If prospects ask reference accounts&nbsp;for additional references, will those customers also&nbsp;provide positive feedback?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How well was the organization’s long-term financial&nbsp;viability demonstrated to buyers so that prospects are&nbsp;assured the firm will be around over the long term? For&nbsp;start-up companies, this may be of particular concern&nbsp;for buyers.</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How much experience can be cited in the buyer’s&nbsp;industry? Are there specific accounts that can be&nbsp;highlighted in which industry-specific problems were&nbsp;solved similar to what the prospect is facing today?</span></li>
</ul>
<h4><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>4. Pricing Model:</span></h4>
<ul>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Was the price of the solution higher or lower than theother short-listed vendors?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Was pricing higher in some areas and lower in others&nbsp;(i.e., low licensing fees but higher professional services&nbsp;</span><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>fees)?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>If your price was higher, is pricing causing you to lose&nbsp;deals?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>If your price was lower, are you leaving money on the&nbsp;</span><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>table?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Did the buyer see value in purchasing your solution?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How did you demonstrate that value?</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>How understandable is your pricing structure? Do&nbsp;you intentionally try to obfuscate pricing to fool your&nbsp;buyers?</span></li>
</ul>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>As you can see, there are many potential reasons for&nbsp;losses. While sales reps and sales leaders sometimes&nbsp;shy away from loss reviews because they assume any&nbsp;<a href=”https://www.primary-intel.com/blog/win-loss-concerns-from-sales-removing-bitter-from-the-sweet/” style=”color: #152d53;”>negative feedback will be targeted at them</a>, buyers&nbsp;frequently cite factors outside of the sales team’s&nbsp;immediate control that can negatively impact the final&nbsp;selection decision. Feedback is not intended to point the&nbsp;finger at sales teams, rather, feedback should point to&nbsp;</span><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>how they could win more deals.</span></p>
<h3><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Understanding Your Market Position Measured Against Competitors</span></h3>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Understanding where you stand in these different&nbsp;categories is important. But equally, if not more&nbsp;critical, is understanding where you stand vis-a-vis&nbsp;your competitors. By understanding your performance&nbsp;in relation to other firms, you’re more accurately&nbsp;understanding your relative areas of strength and&nbsp;weakness, leading to success or failure. When asking for&nbsp;feedback, most Win Loss interviews will request (and&nbsp;buyers will provide) feedback about all short-listed&nbsp;vendors, thereby providing competitive comparisons&nbsp;and differentiation.</span></p>
<h3><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Turn Data into Action</span></h3>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>It’s also important to act upon buyer feedback,&nbsp;particularly when it’s constructive in nature. Most B2B&nbsp;buyers, after going through a multi-month (in some&nbsp;cases, multi-year) evaluation and procurement process,&nbsp;will gladly give their input. Not only were these buyers&nbsp;heavily invested in the details of their firm’s evaluation,&nbsp;they also have a genuine desire to see the greatest&nbsp;number of vendors survive and thrive, providing&nbsp;buyers with the highest number of choices for future&nbsp;consideration.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><a href=”http://ow.ly/b9iI3016aOb” class=”alignright” style=”color: #152d53;”><span class=”image-overlay overlay-type-extern”></span></a>One way of putting findings into action is to <a href=”https://www.primary-intel.com/blog/power-of-discovery-sessions/” style=”color: #152d53;”>conduct&nbsp;360 reviews</a>, asking not just buyers for their feedback,&nbsp;but account teams and those in supporting roles as well.&nbsp;At Primary Intelligence, we help clients put feedback&nbsp;into action by conducting 360-degree review sessions.&nbsp;After talking to buyers to collect their feedback from&nbsp;the evaluation, we then talk to account teams and others&nbsp;involved in the proposal (such as pricing, product, and&nbsp;support groups) to understand likely reasons for buyer&nbsp;perceptions.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>When sales teams tell us what they did that was so&nbsp;effective and contributed to a “win,” we help them&nbsp;put those best practices into place throughout their&nbsp;organizations. Likewise, when buyers identify a root&nbsp;cause problem that pushed an opportunity into the “loss”&nbsp;column, we help clients understand what led to those&nbsp;outcomes as well.</span></p>
<h3><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Bringing It All Together</span></h3>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Having a greater understanding of loss drivers—factors that caused you to lose against other shortlisted&nbsp;vendors—is critical. While it’s hard to get over&nbsp;the initial disappointment and shock of a loss, taking a&nbsp;deep breath and asking for sincere feedback will help&nbsp;you and your teams to improve over the long term. And&nbsp;that’s what makes winning organizations consistently&nbsp;successful.</span></p>
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<img src=”http://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=22968&amp;k=14&amp;r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.customercentric.com%2Fblog%2Fsales-tips-why-good-sales-teams-lose&amp;bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.customercentric.com%252Fblog&amp;bvt=rss” alt=”” width=”1″ height=”1″ style=”min-height:1px!important;width:1px!important;border-width:0!important;margin-top:0!important;margin-bottom:0!important;margin-right:0!important;margin-left:0!important;padding-top:0!important;padding-bottom:0!important;padding-right:0!important;padding-left:0!important; “>

Sales Tips: Nick Saban and Sales – What’s the Connection?

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/sales-tips-nick-saban” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://blog.customercentric.com/hubfs/Nick.jpg?t=1489093932032″ alt=”sales lessons from Nick Saban” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<p><span style=”font-size: 24px; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;”><strong><span style=”color: #152d53;”>Sales Tips: Nick Saban and Sales – What’s the Connection?</span></strong></span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><em>By Gary Walker, EVP of Channel Sales &amp; Operations, <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com”>CustomerCentric Selling®</a></em></span></p>
<img src=”http://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=22968&amp;k=14&amp;r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.customercentric.com%2Fblog%2Fsales-tips-nick-saban&amp;bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.customercentric.com%252Fblog&amp;bvt=rss” alt=”” width=”1″ height=”1″ style=”min-height:1px!important;width:1px!important;border-width:0!important;margin-top:0!important;margin-bottom:0!important;margin-right:0!important;margin-left:0!important;padding-top:0!important;padding-bottom:0!important;padding-right:0!important;padding-left:0!important; “>

Sales Tips: Losing – From Bad to Worse

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/sales-tips-from-bad-to-worse” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://blog.customercentric.com/hubfs/loser-sad-upset-frustrated-seller.png?t=1489093932032″ alt=”sales tips for avoiding long losses” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<p><span style=”font-size: 24px; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;”><strong><span style=”color: #152d53;”>Sales Tips: From Bad to Worse</span></strong></span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><em>By John Holland, Chief Content&nbsp;Officer, <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com”>CustomerCentric Selling®</a></em></span></p>
<img src=”http://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=22968&amp;k=14&amp;r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.customercentric.com%2Fblog%2Fsales-tips-from-bad-to-worse&amp;bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.customercentric.com%252Fblog&amp;bvt=rss” alt=”” width=”1″ height=”1″ style=”min-height:1px!important;width:1px!important;border-width:0!important;margin-top:0!important;margin-bottom:0!important;margin-right:0!important;margin-left:0!important;padding-top:0!important;padding-bottom:0!important;padding-right:0!important;padding-left:0!important; “>

Sales Tips: From Bad to Worse

By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling®

sales tips for avoiding long lossesIf someone were talented enough to finish second in every PGA tournament they participated in, they’d have several mansions, a private jet and sportswriters wondering why they can’t win.

If a salesperson were to come in second on every transaction he or she competed for, it would mean having to live on their base salary until a sales manager decides to replace them.

I’ve said for years the worst possible outcome is to go the distance (an entire sales cycle) and lose, either to another vendor or to no decision. 

Recently I came to realize going the distance and losing is worse than I suspected. Research done by the TAS Group concluded that it takes 50% longer on average for sellers to lose deals than to win them. At first blush that seemed hard to believe, but would you agree most sales cycles that you win tend to have a fairly good pace to them? 

One of the CCS® core concepts is: “Bad news early is good news.” By that we mean as soon as a seller knows he or she isn’t going to get the business, they should consider withdrawing. It’s hard to do, but I hope the realization that if it takes you 4 months to win transactions, you likely will spend 6 months losing opportunities that will help give you courage to walk. Hopefully the found time can be spent finding winnable opportunities.

CCS Evangelists