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Sales Tips: How to Determine If Your Sales Quota Is Realistic

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/bid/102764/sales-training-advice-to-determine-if-your-2014-quota-is-realistic” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://blog.customercentric.com/hubfs/2nd-ed-promo.png?t=1489093932032″ alt=”Sales Tips: How to Determine If Your Sales Quota Is Realistic” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<h1>Sales Tips: Setting a&nbsp;Realistic Sales Quota</h1>
<p><em><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>By Joel McCabe, Sales Benchmark Index (SBI)</span></em></p>
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Sales Tips: Has Your Selling Approach Changed? Your Buyer Has.

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/bid/89364/sales-training-article-has-your-selling-approach-changed” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://blog.customercentric.com/hubfs/buyer-center-whiteboard.png?t=1489093932032″ alt=”Sales Tips: Has Your Selling Approach Changed? Your Buyer Has.” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<h1>Sales Tips: Buyers Have Changed. Has Your Sales Approach Changed?</h1>
<em><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling®</span></em>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>It would be hard to disagree that today’s buyers:</span>
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<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Leverage the Internet and social networking</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Bring sellers into buying cycles later than ever before</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Feel they know their requirements before talking to salespeople</span></li>
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Sales Tips: Find Your Unique Selling Point

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/sales-tips-find-your-unique-selling-point” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”https://www.salesforce.com/content/dam/blogs/ca/Blog%20Posts/psychology-of-sales.jpg” alt=”Sales Tips: Find Your Unique Selling Point” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<p><span style=”font-size: 24px; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;”><strong><span style=”color: #152d53;”>Sales Tips:&nbsp;Find Your Unique Selling Point</span></strong></span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><em><strong>By Lance Davis,</strong> <a href=”http://primary-intel.com”><strong>Primary Intelligence</strong></a></em></span></p>
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Sales Tips: Establishing Common Ground for Buyers and Sellers

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/bid/106347/sales-training-insight-into-common-ground-for-buyers-and-sellers” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://www.customercentric.com/assets/files/95521.jpg” alt=”Sales Tips: Establishing Common Ground for Buyers and Sellers” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<h1>Sales Tips: Establishing Common Ground for Buyers and Sellers</h1>
<em><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling® – <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23547/SalesTrainingWorkshops.html” style=”color: #152d53;”>The Sales Training Company</a></span></em>
<p><span style=”color: #44561b;”><em><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px;”>Image courtesy of&nbsp;Franky242 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net</span></em></span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>One of a sales manager’s primary responsibilities is ensuring salespeople work on qualified opportunities. After executing sales ready messaging® sellers trained in CustomerCentric Selling® should be able to answer the following call debriefing questions:</span><br><br><strong><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>1. What title they called on?</span></strong><br><br><strong><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>2. What goal(s) the buyer shared?</span></strong><br><br><strong><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>3. For each goal, what are the reasons it can’t be achieved today (without your offering)?</span></strong><br><br><strong><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>4. What capabilities within your offering are needed to address the reasons?</span></strong><br><br><strong><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>5. What is the value (potential benefit vs. estimated cost)?</span></strong><br><br><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Oddly enough, if non-Key Players with or without a seller’s help evaluate offerings and request funding, financial approvers will want answers to questions 2 – 5. In the same way, sales managers want to know opportunities are grounded in value and payback, so it is financial approvers want the same assurance. Both parties recognize that without adequate payback expenditures won’t be made.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Sign-up for one the next <span style=”color: #44561b;”><a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23547/SalesTrainingWorkshops.html” style=”color: #44561b;”>sales training workshops</a></span> to learn how to better qualify opportunities and collaborate with buyers.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>You’ve heard me rail on about how many internal evaluations done without seller help focus on products and lack enterprise views of business outcomes that can be improved. Two comments regarding the CCS® approach to qualification:&nbsp;</span></p>
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<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>When champion letters address the debriefing questions, the buyer is far better positioned to explain why initiatives should be funded.</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>If Sequences of Events (SOE) are agreed upon, one of the most critical steps is the cost vs. benefit (usually a “Go/No-Go step) for buyers and vendors.</span></li>
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<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>This points out the value sales professionals should bring to the table. The old view that sellers “educate” buyers should be a distant memory. Information on the Internet is in such abundance that non-Key Players self-educate and value being shielded from seller attempts to influence requirements.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Ultimately sellers and buyers share a common objective: Determine if buying offerings is a sound financial decision. Self-service, non-executive buyers are ill equipped to build business cases. For that reason funding is likely to be denied (and a great deal of time wasted).</span><br></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>For decades, sellers enjoyed an advantage as the keepers of product information. The pendulum swung when the mind-numbing amount of information became available via the Internet and social networking. The pendulum appears to have swung too far.&nbsp;Enlightened buyers armed with information about offerings could benefit from seller efforts to quantify the potential benefits and payback that can be realized.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Buyers and vendors would benefit if they found ways to collaborate when evaluating offerings.&nbsp;</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/app”></a><span style=”color: #44561b;”>Need some help with your sales performance? Take a look at the <span style=”color: #152d53;”><a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23547/SalesTrainingWorkshops.html” style=”color: #152d53;”>sales training workshops </a></span>available to you and improve sales performance.</span></span><br><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #44561b;”><span style=”color: #152d53;”><a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23570/SalesTrainingArticles.html” style=”color: #152d53;”>Read more sales training articles</a></span>&nbsp;from CustomerCentric Selling® – <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-22997/Home.html” style=”color: #44561b;”>The Sales Training Company</a>.</span> </p>
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Sales Tips: Does CRM Just Speed Up the Mess?

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/sales-tips-crm-speeding-up-the-mess” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://blog.customercentric.com/hubfs/crm-input-data.png?t=1489093932032″ alt=”Sales Tips: Does CRM Just Speed Up the Mess?” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<p><span style=”font-size: 24px; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;”><strong><span style=”color: #152d53;”>Sales Tips: Does CRM&nbsp;Just Speed Up the Mess?</span></strong></span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><em>By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com”>CustomerCentric Selling®</a></em></span></p>
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Sales Tips: Discussing Risk to Win the Next Deal

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/bid/102104/sales-training-article-about-discussing-risk-to-win-the-next-deal” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://www.customercentric.com/assets/files/90375.png” alt=”sales training workshops” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<h1>Sales Tips: How Top Sales Reps Discuss Risk to Win the Next Deal</h1>
<span style=”font-style: italic;”><a href=”http://www.salesbenchmarkindex.com//bid/102048/how-top-sales-reps-discuss-risk-to-win-the-next-deal?source=Blog_Email_[How%20Top%20Sales%20Reps%20D]”>By Dan Bernoske, Sales Benchmark Index (SBI)</a></span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>The sooner you discuss risk with the Buyer the better. Why? Two reasons:</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>1. You can dispel “false risk” by eliminating misconceptions the Buyer may have.</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>2. You address risk early. When it’s time to launch your solution, you will be ready to deliver.</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Gartner Group published a study about failed enterprise software implementations. 20-30% fail, and up to 80% exceed time and budget estimates.* </span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>They attribute much of these failures to organizational issues. For sales reps that sell these platforms, there is enormous risk of failure. To close the deals and make the number, these reps must confront the probable risks.</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><strong>5 Types of Risk</strong></span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Let’s be honest, most solutions do not perfectly solve a problem. You close a deal because your solution was the best fit. Not the perfect fit. It will have shortcomings. The customer will find reasons to be unhappy. Something might break.</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>You have a choice. You can ignore the risks and pretend that everything will be perfect. Or you can embrace the risks and discuss them with the Buyer. Here are the 5 primary areas of concern your Buyer may have. These risks can come from the client or from you. Either way, keep an open mind and address them.</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><strong>1. Career.</strong> Apprehension that a failed implementation could lead to termination or demotion. This could be the toughest subject to talk about. If your solution is innovative and new, it could carry this added risk. Sometimes the status quo is what keeps a job. Will your Buyer get sacked if this fails? On the flip side of that coin, will this launch their career?</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><strong>2. Talent.</strong> Risk their team lacks the ability to adopt and manage a new solution. Managing the status quo is the easiest way to hold down a job. For many, learning new capabilities is extra work for the same pay. This closed-minded attitude can doom a project to failure. Then there is the issue of raw talent. Your Buyer may not have the technical expertise to launch and manage your solution.</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><strong>3. Execution.</strong> Uncertainty about whether the desired implementation timeline can be met. A great idea is only as good as its execution. Lack of management support can jeopardize a project. Perhaps the timing of a deployment falls in the middle of a busy season. Or maybe the needed resources are on leave or tied up with other priorities.</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><strong>4. Operational.</strong> Fear of the potential business disruption during the transition to a new solution. Your Buyer’s organization may have competing responsibilities. There may be a potential interruption of service. A transition period my not be successful. Workflows may need to change and be re-trained.</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><strong>5. Financial.</strong> Concerns regarding implementation delays or errors. Will a delay cause a loss in revenue? Will the Buyer assume extra costs? Would this give the competition (yours or the Buyer’s) an advantage? This pain is most easily quantified.</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”><strong>What’s Next</strong><br></span>Schedule a meeting with the Buyer to discuss potential concerns. Position the meeting as one where you share the risks with them. Discuss some common concerns and some specific ones you see here. The objective is to come up with mitigation plans for each.</span>
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<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Develop a mitigation plan for each known risk. Share your findings with your manager. Then work it out with the Buyer. The sooner you discuss risk with the Buyer the better. You will prove yourself to be a trusted resource.</span>
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<a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/app”></a>
<span style=”color: #152d53;”><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px;”>Need some help with your sales performance? Take a look at the </span><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px;”><a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23547/SalesTrainingWorkshops.html” style=”color: #152d53;”><strong>sales training workshops </strong></a>available to you and </span><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px;”><strong>improve sales performance</strong>.&nbsp;</span><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px;”><a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23570/SalesTrainingArticles.html” style=”color: #152d53;”>Read more <strong>sales training</strong> articles</a>&nbsp;from </span><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px;”>CustomerCentric Selling® – <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-22997/Home.html” style=”color: #152d53;”>The Sales Training Company</a>.</span></span>
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Sales Tips: Cleaning the Pipeline Closet

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<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/bid/106114/sales-training-tips-about-cleaning-the-pipeline-closet” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://www.customercentric.com/assets/files/95041.jpg” alt=”Sales Tips: Cleaning the Pipeline Closet” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
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<h1>Sales Tips: Clean the Pipeline Closet</h1>
<p><em><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling® – <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23547/SalesTrainingWorkshops.html” style=”color: #152d53;”>The Sales Training Company</a></span></em></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Maybe you’re better about it than I, but closet clutter is a challenge for me. It was partly caused by a move from a 60-year old center entrance colonial in New England to a newer home in California with our first walk-in closet. Ultimately I’ve become more careful about what clothes I buy and try to throw out or donate anything that hasn’t been worn in a year. Many organizations have pipelines that resemble overstuffed closets and there are two major causes.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><strong>Cause #1: Garbage in</strong> – At one time or another a seller comes to the realization that their pipeline is thin. It can be a positive development if you’ve closed a number of opportunities in a given month or quarter. In any event, if you are going to have a pipeline review with your manager there’s a tendency to list “opportunities” that have not been qualified. The last thing you want is a manager that feels you don’t have enough going on and will be monitoring your activity levels.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>For experienced sellers or sellers that have new sales managers, it isn’t a huge challenge to “sell” them on opportunities that really don’t belong. Part of the reason is pipelines roll up. Managers want to believe so that their district or regional pipelines looks strong. In my experience if salespeople could sell as well to buyers as they can “sell” managers that their pipelines are adequate, they’d all be making their numbers.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Try one of these <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23438/TheSalesTrainingCompanyGetStarted.html” style=”color: #152d53;”>sales training workshops</a> that can help you learn to better manage opportunities and your pipeline for improved results.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><strong>Cause #2: No spring cleaning</strong> – Once things get into a seller’s pipeline we all know the best way to get them out is to close them. The challenge, however, is that if they weren’t qualified when they were entered and they can’t be qualified after that, the seller has a problem. He or she doesn’t want to declare losses because:</span></p>
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<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>The manager will start asking about rebuilding their pipelines.</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Their win rates will be negatively impacted.</span></li>
</ul>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>When new opportunities enter their pipelines many sellers chose that flurry of activity to quietly allow unqualified ones to drop off the radar screen.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><strong>In the same way clothes that haven’t been worn in a year should be discarded or donated, how long should pipeline entries be allowed to hang with no activity indicating progress such as:</strong>&nbsp;</span></p>
<ul>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>A champion has been qualified and the seller is getting access to Key Players</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Key Player visions are documented in emails</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>A Sequence of Events has been negotiated with an estimated decision date</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>A cost vs. benefit analysis has been completed</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Contracts are being reviewed</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>A proposal has been issued</span></li>
</ul>
<p><strong><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Sales managers can do everyone a good service if:&nbsp;</span></strong></p>
<ul>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Qualification criteria are applied before opportunities enter pipelines.</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Measureable progress is required to keep them in the pipeline.</span></li>
<li><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>Outstanding proposals can only be viewed as viable if they are less than 60 days old or there are extenuating circumstances. To minimize this issue, managers may want to set criteria that needs to be met before proposals are issued.</span></li>
</ul>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>The calendar, if not the weather, says spring has arrived. Would a little spring cleaning of your pipeline give you a more accurate picture of what revenue realistically can be expected in the coming months?</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”><a href=”https://www.facebook.com/CustomerCentric-Selling-49207916393/?ref=s”></a></span></p>
<p>Need some help with your sales performance? Take a look at the <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23547/SalesTrainingWorkshops.html”><strong>sales training workshops </strong></a>available to you and <strong>improve sales performance</strong>.</p>
<p><a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23570/SalesTrainingArticles.html”>Read more <strong>sales training</strong> articles</a>&nbsp;from CustomerCentric Selling® – <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-22997/Home.html”>The Sales Training Company</a>.</p>
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<img src=”http://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=22968&amp;k=14&amp;r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.customercentric.com%2Fblog%2Fbid%2F106114%2Fsales-training-tips-about-cleaning-the-pipeline-closet&amp;bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.customercentric.com%252Fblog&amp;bvt=rss” alt=”” width=”1″ height=”1″ style=”min-height:1px!important;width:1px!important;border-width:0!important;margin-top:0!important;margin-bottom:0!important;margin-right:0!important;margin-left:0!important;padding-top:0!important;padding-bottom:0!important;padding-right:0!important;padding-left:0!important; “>

Sales Tips: Avoid Death by RFP

<div class=”hs-featured-image-wrapper”>
<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/bid/102763/sales-training-tip-with-steps-to-avoid-death-by-rfp” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://www.customercentric.com/assets/files/91016.png” alt=”Sales Tips: Avoid Death by RFP” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
</div>
<div class=”hs-migrated-cms-post”>
<h1>Sales Tips: Avoid Death by RFP</h1>
<p><em><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”>By Scott Gruher, Sales Benchmark Index (SBI)</span></em></p>
<span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px; color: #152d53;”></span>
</div>
<img src=”http://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=22968&amp;k=14&amp;r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.customercentric.com%2Fblog%2Fbid%2F102763%2Fsales-training-tip-with-steps-to-avoid-death-by-rfp&amp;bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.customercentric.com%252Fblog&amp;bvt=rss” alt=”” width=”1″ height=”1″ style=”min-height:1px!important;width:1px!important;border-width:0!important;margin-top:0!important;margin-bottom:0!important;margin-right:0!important;margin-left:0!important;padding-top:0!important;padding-bottom:0!important;padding-right:0!important;padding-left:0!important; “>

Sales Tips: “Event” Seller vs. “Process” Seller

<div class=”hs-featured-image-wrapper”>
<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/are-you-an-event-seller-or-process-seller” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://blog.customercentric.com/hubfs/buyer-reviewing-info-562149-edited.png?t=1489093932032″ alt=”sales process” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
</div>
<h1>Sales Tips: “Event” Seller vs.&nbsp;”Process” Seller</h1>
<p><em><span style=”font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 14px;”><span style=”color: #152d53;”>By Frank Visgatis, President &amp; Chief Operating Officer, CustomerCentric Selling® -</span> <a href=”http://www.customercentric.com/browse-23547/SalesTrainingWorkshops.html”>The Sales Training Company</a></span></em></p>
<img src=”http://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=22968&amp;k=14&amp;r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.customercentric.com%2Fblog%2Fare-you-an-event-seller-or-process-seller&amp;bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.customercentric.com%252Fblog&amp;bvt=rss” alt=”” width=”1″ height=”1″ style=”min-height:1px!important;width:1px!important;border-width:0!important;margin-top:0!important;margin-bottom:0!important;margin-right:0!important;margin-left:0!important;padding-top:0!important;padding-bottom:0!important;padding-right:0!important;padding-left:0!important; “>

Sales Tips: Best Practices for Collecting B2B Research Data

<div class=”hs-featured-image-wrapper”>
<a href=”http://blog.customercentric.com/blog/sales-tips-best-practices-for-collecting-b2b-research-data” title=”” class=”hs-featured-image-link”> <img src=”http://blog.customercentric.com/hubfs/at-laptop.png?t=1489093932032″ alt=”at-laptop.png” class=”hs-featured-image” style=”width:auto !important; max-width:50%; float:left; margin:0 15px 15px 0;”> </a>
</div>
<p><span style=”font-size: 24px; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;”><strong><span style=”color: #152d53;”>Sales Tips: Best Practices for Collecting Quantitative and Qualitative B2B Research Data</span></strong></span></p>
<img src=”http://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=22968&amp;k=14&amp;r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.customercentric.com%2Fblog%2Fsales-tips-best-practices-for-collecting-b2b-research-data&amp;bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.customercentric.com%252Fblog&amp;bvt=rss” alt=”” width=”1″ height=”1″ style=”min-height:1px!important;width:1px!important;border-width:0!important;margin-top:0!important;margin-bottom:0!important;margin-right:0!important;margin-left:0!important;padding-top:0!important;padding-bottom:0!important;padding-right:0!important;padding-left:0!important; “>